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§ 50‑45.1. Disclosure by arbitrator.

  • (a) Before accepting appointment, an individual who is requested to serve as an arbitrator, after making a reasonable inquiry, shall disclose to all parties to the agreement to arbitrate and to the arbitration proceeding and to any other arbitrators any known facts that a reasonable person would consider likely to affect the impartiality of the arbitrator in the arbitration proceeding, including:
    1. A financial or personal interest in the outcome of the arbitration proceeding.
    2. An existing or past relationship with any of the parties to the agreement to arbitrate or to the arbitration proceeding, their counsel or representatives, a witness, or other arbitrators.
  • (b) An arbitrator has a continuing obligation to disclose to all parties to the agreement to arbitrate and to the arbitration proceeding and to any other arbitrators any facts that the arbitrator learns after accepting appointment that a reasonable person would consider likely to affect the impartiality of the arbitrator.
  • (c) If an arbitrator discloses a fact required by subsection (a) or (b) of this section to be disclosed and a party timely objects to the appointment or continued service of the arbitrator based upon the fact disclosed, the objection may be grounds for vacating an award made by the arbitrator under G.S. 50‑54(a)(2).
  • (d) If the arbitrator did not disclose a fact as required by subsection (a) or (b) of this section, upon timely objection by a party, the court may vacate an award pursuant to G.S. 50‑54(a)(2).
  • (e) An arbitrator appointed as a neutral arbitrator who does not disclose a known, direct, and material interest in the outcome of the arbitration proceeding or a known, existing, and substantial relationship with a party is presumed to act with evident partiality under G.S. 50‑54(a)(2).
  • (f) If the parties to an arbitration proceeding agree to the procedures of an arbitration institution or any other procedures for challenges to arbitrators before an award is made, substantial compliance with those procedures is a condition precedent to a motion to vacate an award on those grounds pursuant to G.S. 50‑54(a)(2). (2005‑187, s. 5.)

Call the Law Office of John P. Fernandez if you have questions or need legal representation in a family law matter. John Fernandez is licensed to practice law in North Carolina. The laws of North Carolina may differ from other states and no information contained herein should be considered legal advice.

About John Fernandez

John P. Fernandez | Child Custody and Divorce Lawyer | Raleigh, NCAttorney John Fernandez works with North Carolina individuals and families who need advice or representation in estate planning and administration matters. John provides an in-depth analysis of each client’s needs and works toward reducing estate taxes, avoiding probate and ensuring that health care decisions are handled appropriately. John helps individuals with modest and large estates achieve their goals.

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John P. Fernandez
Attorney at Law
9555 US Highway 15-501 North
Chapel Hill, NC 27517
(919) 601-5028

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